Real Money Transaction Tm Sean

Fraudsters can easily fake the “friendly name” in the sender’s email address. For example, an email can appear to be from “PayPal Services,” but actually be from [email protected]

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Some email clients make it hard to see the real name. But if you mouse over the friendly name or click “Reply,” you should be able to see the full email address of the sender. Sophisticated fraudsters can fake the entire name to look like a legitimate sender, so be careful.

Real Money Transaction Tm Sean Paul

Though verifying a correct sender address is important, it’s not enough. It’s important to look at the entire email. When you check your account, always enter 'www.PayPal.com' into your browser instead of clicking a link in an email.

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is

It allows you to connect your bank account, get your money transferred quickly and safely and requires no coding knowledge to set up using our system. Stripe charges a separate processing fee of 2.9% + 30 cents that applies to all transactions.

Advance fee fraud. Most of us are careful if a stranger approaches on the street and offers a deal that's just too good to be true. But we're much less cautious online, which puts us at risk. If you get an offer for free money, there's probably a catch. Typically, fraudsters will ask you to send some smaller amount (for taxes, for legal documents, etc.) before they can send you the millions you are promised, but which they never intend to send you.

Verify through your PayPal account. If you receive an email that says that you've received a PayPal payment, take a moment to log in to your PayPal account before you ship any merchandise. Make sure that money has actually been transferred, and that it isn’t just a scam. Remember not to follow email links. The safest way to access your account is always to open a browser window, navigate to PayPal.com, and enter your login info.

Be aware of telltale signs of fraud. Messages asking you to pay a small handling fee to collect some fabulous prize are usually a scam. “High-Profit No-Risk” investments are usually scams. Messages insisting that you “Act Now!” for a great deal are often scams.

Fake charities. Scammers use disasters to trick kind-hearted people into donating to fake charities. This usually happens when there is a refugee crisis, a terrorist attack, or a natural disaster (like an earthquake, flooding, or famine). Thoroughly check the background of any charity to make sure your donation goes to real victims.

Use resources like

to check out charities. If a charity does not have a website, be cautious.

MoneySean

To learn more about common scams and how to avoid them, search online for more about advance fee fraud. You can also read the FBI's material on common types of scams. Most importantly: be as cautious online as you are in the real world.